ReCode Knoxville Charrette
Project overview
YEAR: 2019 CLIENT: Knoxville-Knox County Planning LOCATION: Charrette was held at the Knoxville Facilities Building on Morris Avenue VOLUNTEER(S): Richard Foster, AIA, Christina Bouler, AIA and Erik Hall, AIA

There were four main goals the charrette wanted to accomplish, which were dictated to all of the teams.

Those goals were: to test the code and map with real world studies, determine if the code and map were in alignment with the collective vision for the city, explore how the code would shape the city, and assess the general usability and format of the code in order to provide comprehensive feedback to Knoxville-Knox County Planning.

Recode Knoxville started in 2017 as an effort to carefully evaluate and modernize the existing zoning codes, which had dictated the built form of the city without any major overhaul for nearly half a century. Through a collaboration of design and planning professionals and many public input meetings, drafts of the zoning map and code book were created and revised. … Read More

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Recode Knoxville started in 2017 as an effort to carefully evaluate and modernize the existing zoning codes, which had dictated the built form of the city without any major overhaul for nearly half a century. Through a collaboration of design and planning professionals and many public input meetings, drafts of the zoning map and code book were created and revised. As of January 2019, the fourth draft of the code book and the third draft of the map had been released for public input, and in an effort to test out the practicality and comprehension of the updates, an afternoon-long charrette was scheduled for February.

On Friday, February 1, 2019, at the City Public Works Building, local architects, planners, developers, and students from Professor Marleen Davis’s third year Design Studio at the University of Tennessee’s College of Architecture + Design gathered together and formed six teams to study how the new codes affected six distinct sites throughout the city. The results from each team were presented at the end of the charrette and a public reception was held afterward that allowed one-on-one interactions with the designers to review the successes and failures of the new codes. The Team findings from the charrette can be found in the booklet on our Issuu page.

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